<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Other 8-point center-point stars block info
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Other center-point stars

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Click on a graphic to see a whole-quilt mockup of the block. The "Make It!" icons link to diagrams (purple) or instructions outside this site (blue).

V. Block
V. Block

The "V" in the Ladies Art Company's Block #483 (1922) probably stood for Victory in World War I—or at least for the cease-fire agreement, the Armistice, signed in 1918.

Here's a factoid: The "war to end all wars" formally ended when Germany made the last of its reparation payments for the cost of the war—in 2010!

V Block
V Block

This star, so similar to the LAC's #483, was published without attribution in Jinny Beyer's 2009 Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns.

The pieces in dark red make up a classic symbol called the Cross of Malta. For more on the Maltese Cross, click here:

The Maltese Cross also appears in a block called Chimney Swallows:

Long-pointed Star

Long-pointed Star

This beautiful star, with its two lengths of star points, is drawn up on a circular star grid. It was published in the Kansas City Star in April 1942.

The fact that it is drawn on a circular grid is an insight we owe to Jinny Beyer and her Quilter's Album (2009).

Star of Empire


Hattie's Choice
Star of Empire

Clara Stone's Star of Empire is a cousin of the Long-pointed Star, and it's a forerunner of the Cathedral Window quilting that became a trend some 80 years later. Cathedral Window puts a black border around each part of a block, giving it the look of leaded glass.

And what of the bizarre name? We'd guess that it was a reference to the British Empire, which was still strong, and also to a sentiment that because America had British roots, it was still British at heart. That "special relationship" has faded.


Hattie's Choice

Stone's Hattie's Choice, #70 in her Practical Needlework of 1906, is obviously kin to the Star of Empire, except that it's dressed up and ready for town, with one more layer of concentric shapes.

We've posted both blocks in lavender here because — well, we just felt like it.

Enigma
Enigma

The Ladies Art Company's 1897 catalog had 400 blocks, or so we're told. That makes Enigma, #400, the last LAC block to see print in the 19th century.

Enigma is drafted with four lines running through the center of the block. The star points are located where those lines cross two circles. One circle is the full width of the block and the other is half the width of the block. You don't see the circles on the finished block.

Like so many other LAC blocks, the illustration was in two colors, dark and light, and was very likely meant to be made with dark- and light-colored scraps. In any case, take a look at the whole-quilt mockups (click on the graphic) and see if you like it with three.





If you've stumbled across this block when you were looking for Nancy Cabot's Enigma Square, click here: