<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Blocks with concave center circles block info
Field Guide to Quilts.com

Concave centers

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Click on a graphic to see the whole-quilt mockups.

Bleeding Heart (LAC)
Bleeding Heart

Bleeding Heart came into print as #501 in the 1928 Ladies Art Company catalog. Remember, that was the jazz age, and the Art Deco movement was in full swing. Doubtless, quilters were hungry for curves and challenges.

The block is pretty, and the whole quilt is lovely too, but it looks completely different -- more like a series of four-petaled flowers inside medallions. Check it out by clicking on the graphic at left.

Turkey Tracks Var.

Turkey Tracks

The Kansas City Star published this block in 1929, noting that it was from a Star "exhibition home." Presumably, that gave it the Star's equivalent of a Good Housekeeping seal of approval. The designer was Eveline Foland.

The block appeared in 2 colors, dark on a light background. We've reversed those colors to show the seamlines.


Turkey Tracks

Turkey Tracks

The Kansas City Star published Turkey Tracks in June 1936. The designer is unknown; the contributor sketched the block from a quilt displayed at the Star's own "Better Homes Show" in 1928.

The Star said that Turkey Tracks inspired the "Star Quilt Series"—thus suggesting that the newspaper published a whole series of blocks before it published the block that inspired it.


Old Maid's Puzzle

Old Maid's Puzzle

A block with both sawtooth rows and curves is unusual. This one was published about 1931 in a booklet called Prize Winning Designs, according to Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns.

 


Lost Paradise

Lost Paradise

In publishing this block in 1939, the Kansas City Star recommended that half of the 8 fan shapes be in a yellow print and half in a blue print. We're not sure how those colors would be placed, but the accompanying illustration had a single print fabric, and we followed suit.


Pine Burr

Pine Burr

The Pine Burr at left is from Clara Stone's 1906 booklet Practical Needlework, but it is only one of a number of similar blocks that have only straight lines and are called feathered stars. We'd put Stone's Pine Burr there, but in this site's organization, curves hold the trump card.