<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Faux circles/blocks with octagon information
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Storm at Sea


Storm at Sea
Storm at Sea

The graphic at left shows Storm at Sea the way it was originally published in the Kansas City Star in 1932. The center block was a print in the dark and light colors. Eveline Foland, the Star's quilt columnist, cited Clara Miller of Ft. Scott, Kansas for the design. In any case, the block is based on an 8x8 grid.

Usually, this block is made as an offset square, i.e. with only two long diamonds and one corner square-in-square. Then you add a row of the missing design to the top and right side of the whole quilt.

You'll see both versions as whole quilts when you click on either graphic at left. We've also added a mockup of a gorgeous combination of Storm at Sea and Snail Trail. It's the brainchild of Julie Baird of generations-quilt-patterns.com. Click here to see the mockup reproduced on our site:  Click here to see Snail Trail:

Snowball

Snowball
Job's Troubles/Melon Patch

The earliest version of Snowball was probably a publication by a company called Joseph Doyle, which produced quilt-block booklets as early as 1911. That publisher called it Snowball. The block is also known as Job's Troubles (1906) and Melon Patch (1973). It's also part of a larger block called Flagstones, published by the Ladies Art Company in 1928 (#514).

The size of the corner triangles varies, but not by much.

Snowball has 2 strong points as a design feature: It showcases quilting stitches, and it is dressier than a plain block when the whole-quilt design is laid out as a checkerboard.
This is its use in a popular quilt pattern called Tennessee Waltz, designed by Sue Bouchard for Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day pattern series. In Tennessee Waltz, Snowball alternates with a version of 54-40 or Fight:

There is also a curved Snowball block, and some of its variations make more of the design possibilities of the curved corner. Washington Snow Ball is one of them. Click here to see it:


The Marble Floor
The Marble Floor

The Marble Floor "is an easy one to make, but looks quite elaborate when finished," wrote designer Eveline Foland when this block was first published in the Kansas City Star in 1930. She recommended dark, light, and "figured" fabric arranged as we've shown it here.

The Wishing Ring
The Wishing Ring

The design of this Kansas City Star block from 1950 literally turns on a striped fabric; each side patch is turned 90 degrees from the neighboring striped patch. The center square was a print.

Grecian Designs
Grecian Designs
Grecian Square/Grecian/Greek Square

The LAC's #152, this block has precisely the same patch layout as a Double Monkey Wrench, but it looks completely different. The names above are from Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns.

For Double Monkey Wrench, click on this icon:


Squirrel in a Cage


Rolling Stone


Johnnie Round
the Corner (Hall)


Kitty Corner (Finley)


Johnnie Around
the Corner (LAC)

Squirrel in a Cage

When Squirrel in a Cage was published in the Kansas City Star in 1935, the newspaper noted that it was an old block, and that the contributor had copied it from a quilt made by her mother.

This block, as well as Rolling Stone and Johnnie Round the Corner, can be made with the instructions for a block that quilterscache.com calls Broken Wheel. Click on the Make it! icon to go there.


Rolling Stone

As it happens, the block was a color variation on the LAC's Rolling Stone (#216, left). The block layout is exactly the same as the Squirrel in a Cage layout, but you would have to look twice to notice it.


Johnnie Round the Corner

Single Wedding Ring

Quilt researcher Carrie Hall found the same block in three colors with the names Johnnie Round the Corner and Single Wedding Ring (Havig).

Kitty Corner

Our favorite quilt researcher, the remarkable Ruth Finley, published Kitty Corner in her 1929 book Old Patchwork Quilts: And the Women Who Made Them. It's on a 12 x 12 grid, but it's an obvious cousin to the other designs of its type. You'll see how the proportions affect the look in the whole-quilt mockup; click on the icon to see it.


Johnnie Around the Corner

Johnny Around the Corner

The LAC had also published a 2-color Johnnie Around the Corner block in 1897. Because it is laid out on an 8x8 grid rather than a 6x6 grid, its proportions are more slender than the Hall/Havig variation. Like Rolling Stone, it looks nothing like "a round" anything, but we'll admit that it does have corners.

It would be interesting to know whether the LAC block morphed into the variation that Carrie Hall published in 1935, or whether it was created independently.

In any case, it is the 1897 (8x8) version in the instructions in Marcia Hohn's QuiltersCache.com that you'll see -- called Johnny Around the Corner -- if you click on the "Make It!" icon above.


The Big O
The Big O

If you love Chase Bank, this block will make your life complete. We've exaggerated the seam lines in the graphic at left. From Maggie Malone's 5,500 Quilt Block Designs (2003).