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Flowers

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Triple Sunflower

Triple Sunflower

Clara Stone's 169th block, collected in Practical Needlework (1906), is one of several sunflower blocks with slightly dissimilar proportions. Stone's is based on a 13 x 13 grid, an oddity we discovered by tracing the block. The stems and leaves are appliqued.

We've included a diagram; click on the icon at upper right.

Bluebells
Bluebell

Bluebell

The Kansas City Star published this gem first. "For the center square," the KCS said, "Choose either blue or the same material in which the leaves were developed." The illustration, however, shows a print.

The block's curved pieces (all pieced rather than appliquéd) were actually a tad more slender than we've shown it here.


Springtime
Springtime

From the Detroit Free Press' Book No. 6, (1933), per Jinny Beyer's beautiful Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns (2009). We don't know the block's original coloring, so we've chosen light shades that show the seam lines.
Flower Vase
Flower Vase

Flower Vase

Designer Nancy Page (Florence La Ganke) didn't take credit for this 1936 block published in the Chicago Tribune. The block was so popular, she wrote, that it might once have been used for 3 out of 20 of a typical family's quilts.


Noon Day Lily


North Carolina Lily

Fire Lily
North Carolina Lily variation

Noon Day Lily

The Ladies Art Company offered its #51, Noon Day Lily, in 1897. The block was in 2 colors—as we've shown it here, but with a white background.

The block is recognizable by its parallelogram petals, stem, and pair of leaves. The appliquéd pieces—the stems and leaves—may vary in placement, shape, and so forth. The pieced flower heads do not.

North Carolina Lily
Wood Lily, Meadow Lily, Mountain Lily, Fire Lily, Mountain Lily, Noon-Day Lily

This variation of the Noon Day Lily had quite a few miles on it by 1929, when author Ruth Finley wrote that she had found the block in 6 different places, each time under a local name. It was called Wood Lily in the Northeast; Meadow Lily in Connecticut; Mountain Lily in Tennessee and Kentucky; Fire Lily in Ohio and Illinois; and Mountain Lily or Noon-Day Lily elsewhere in the midwest.

We've pictured the North Carolina Lily as seamstress Carrie Hall stitched in the 1930s. That block is now part of the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas.

A leafless variation appeared in 5,500 Quilt Block Designs by Maggie Malone (2003). Malone's version has the flowers in white on a white background; we've added color to make them more visible.

Magnolia Bud (KCS)


Magnolia Bud (Hall)

Magnolia Bud

Magnolia Bud is a Kansas City Star block credited to Eveline Foland. It was published in March 1932, during the first weeks of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration. (The Star published it again in 1947.)

The Star, then, may have been a source for Carrie Hall when she included it in The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America in 1935.

While the Star's version is based on an 8x8 grid, Hall's version, according to Jinny Beyer and her Quilter's Album (2009), is on a 7x7 grid.

Which looks better to you? Check out the two whole-quilt layouts we've provided for each by clicking on any left-column graphic.