<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Border blocks
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Border blocks

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Click on a left-column block to see a whole-quilt mockup.

The Rope Strands
The Rope Strands

The Rope Strands appeared in The Kansas City Star in 1941. The rectangles were made from a single print fabric, and the long hexagons were a lighter solid. It is not specifically described as a border block, but that's how we would use it.


Ribbon Border
Ribbon Border

Ribbon Border was block #157 in the Ladies Art Company catalog of 1897. Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album tells us that Nancy Cabot, columnist at the Chicago Tribune, called it Beach and Boats in 1937.


Ocean Waves
Ocean Waves

The Ladies Art Company published Ocean Waves as #182 in 1897. The block was always intended as a border; the illustration showed ragged edges on each side of the block, and the finished size (if you bought the pattern) was six inches by twelve.

Shadows

Shadows

Carrie Hall, quilt researcher, stitched up one of these blocks for her collection of block designs, now at the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas. Hall collected the designs in the 1930s. (Note: our block is a square based on a 4x4 grid, but Hall's was three triangles wide and two triangles tall -- a 6x4 grid size.)


The World Fair
Quilt

The World Fair Quilt

The Kansas City Star published The World [sic] Fair Quilt in 1943. The Star didn't show it as a border block, but it's so well suited for one that we thought it belonged here. We've reversed the dark and light colors to show the seams. Click on the block to see a whole-quilt mockup of each setting.


The Picket
Fence Quilt
(Pattern)


The Picket
Fence Quilt
(Illustration)

The Picket Fence Quilt

Like The World Fair Quilt, The Picket Fence is suited for a border block, but was not published as one.

An oddity of the pattern is that when The Kansas City Star's Weekly Edition published it in 1954, the illustration didn't match the pattern piece printed along with it. The block at left is based on the pattern. The block at bottom left is based on the illustration.

The Star pointed out that 2 settings were possible, one horizontal, the other vertical. You'll see them both when you click on one of the graphics at left.

In the top layout at left, the block's legs are twice as long as they are wide, like this:

The lower left layout has block legs three times as long as they are wide, like this:

. . . which also creates the interesting setting at right.


 

Click on any block to see whole-quilt mockups. We've included mockups of borders too.