<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Patterned hexagonal blocks
FieldGuidetoQuilts.com

Log Cabin hexagons

Click on a graphic to see a whole-quilt mockup. If you got to this page via a link, take a look at our other hexagon blocks by clicking on one of these icons:


Log Cabin Hexagon
Log Cabin Hexagon

If you search for a log cabin hexagon on line, this is the block you'll find. It's closer to symmetrical than the other options for making a log cabin-style hexagon, and better yet, and it allows for concentric designs like the one at left.

You make it like a log cabin, by adding bar to bar, but this particular variation involves cutting the first bar shape into a triangle and a parallelogram, as shown in the tutorial linked to the "Make It!" icon, above right. After that, you add two bars at a time. You could almost call it a Courthouse Steps hexagon:

Pineapple
Hexagon



Pineapple Hexagon
Pineapple Hexagon

The pineapple hexagon is named for its resemblance to a very old, square block design with a similar rows of identical colors. The color placement brings out the jagged edges of successive rows.

Pineapple hexagons are asymmetrical, a characteristic brought out when there are fewer rows, such block at top left. It's colored as if it were a scrap quilt.

Pineapples were symbols of hospitality in the colonial era because they were the sort of fancy food you would offer guests. It's unlikely that the name would have stuck inland. Here's our page on pineapple blocks:

One important point for making a whole quilt: Because the pineapple hexagon has colors set asymmetrically in the block, you'll have to add one small triangle to every block to make the pineapple shapes fit together in a whole quilt. We've shown the triangles' placement in the whole-quilt mockup.

Swirling Hexagon
Swirling Hexagon

Another clever discovery of the log cabins' potential, this log cabin-plus-triangles block is the work of thepartfaitcafe.com, which includes a free tutorial on its blog.