<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> 9-patches with other shapes block information
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Nine patch with other shapes

 

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Click on an icon to see whole-quilt mockups of these blocks.


The Practical Orchard


Hour-Glass, No. 2
The Practical Orchard
Practical Orchard

It's hard to imagine a more inexplicable name than the one that the Ladies Art Company gave to its block #141, The Practical Orchard (1897). Nor do we see any reason for diagonal seams: that is, no obvious reason a quilter wouldn't use simple, undivided squares instead:

Perhaps it was meant to be a scrap quilt. In any case, quilt columnist Nancy Cabot apparently thought the diagonals were pointless too. She presented the block without them as Practical Orchard in the Chicago Tribune in 1934.


Hour-Glass, No. 2

Clara Stone, in Practical Needlework (1906), gave the same block a different name and a third color. It adds a new flavor to the design. Click on either graphic to see whole-quilt mockups.

True Lover's Knot


True Lover's Knot


Bradford 9-Patch

True Lover's Knot

The version at upper left, which is drawn on a 12x12 grid, is credited to Woman's World Magazine in both Brackman and Yvonne Khin's Collector's Dictionary of Quilt Names and Patterns; Brackman adds that publication was in 1931.

True Lover's Knot was also drawn on a 10x10 grid in The Dressmaking Book (1929), according to Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album of Patchwork Patterns.


Bradford 9-Patch

Designer Nancy Page produced this block for the Birmingham News in 1941. Despite its kinship to True Lover's Knot, it looks entirely different in a group setting; we've shown both on a whole-quilt page. Just click on a graphic to go there.

Stepping Stones



Nose Gay
Stepping Stones

The earliest version of this design was in a Grandma Dexter booklet from Virginia Snow Studios, published about 1932. The Virginia Snow arrangement of 5 colors is reproduced at left. We think it's hideous, but it works surprisingly well as a whole quilt. Click on the graphic to see it.

The blue "Make It!" icon links to block instructions in Marcia Hohn's QuiltersCache.com; you can also use our diagram by clicking on the violet "Make it!" icon below.



Nose Gay
Nosegay

Since the older blocks were almost always printed in black and white, we're assuming that this block was in two colors when the Chicago Tribune published it in 1933 as Nose Gay. A year later, designer Alice Beyer published it in the book Quilting as Nosegay.

Most quilters weren't born yesterday, but for those who were, a nosegay is a small bouquet. (It makes your nose happy, in the older sense of the word.)


5 Patch
5 Patch
Puss in the Corner/New 9-Patch

The Ladies Art Company's block #82 apparently had no other name but 5 Patch until the Gutcheons published it as Puss in the Corner in The Perfect Patchwork Primer in 1973. New 9-Patch came along in 1980, in a book by Jinny Beyer.


Goose in the Pond
Goose in the Pond
Geometric Garden/Missouri Puzzle/Mrs. Wolf's Red Beauty/The Scrap Bag/Young Man's Fancy

The LAC's 1897 catalog included Goose in the Pond as #202. The second oldest name, Missouri Puzzle, was from Clara Stone's Practical Needlework (1906).

The block produces a handsome quilt top. Click on the icon to see.

Long Nine Patch

Long Nine Patch
Nine Patch Star Quilt/Road to Oklahoma

The Kansas City Star published this block under 2 different names on 3 different occasions. Long Nine Patch appeared in 1940 and 1949. Road to Oklahoma came along in 1956, the same year an entirely different Road to Oklahoma design also appeared in the Star. To see the other one, click here:

The name Nine Patch Star Quilt was from an 1953 Aunt Martha booklet, according to Jinny Beyer's Quilter's Album (2009).

By any name, the block makes a pretty quilt redolent of the Wild West. Click on the block to see a mockup.


Hour Glass (Finley)
Hour Glass

A simple block that would be excellent for a scrap quilt, Hour Glass was published in Ruth Finley's Old Patchwork Quilts in 1929. Since the design is so simple, it can't easily be overwhelmed by the circus of prints and colors that came from a thrifty quilter's scrap bag.