<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> One-way diagonal blocks
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Carrie Nation block
Carrie Nation Quilt



Carrie Nation

The Carrie Nation Quilt

The Kansas City Star published this block twice, in 1940 and 1947. It made sense: Carrie Nation sold a lot of newspapers.

Nation was a Kentucky-born activist whose first husband died of delirium tremens, a nightmarish side effect of alcohol withdrawal, in 1869, leaving her with a young daughter who was mentally ill.
Nation blamed alcohol for it all.

In 1900, after what she believed was a vision from God, Nation took to smashing glassware, bottles, mirrors, and furniture in the saloons of Kansas. She was nearly six feet tall, and she was especially fearsome after she started using a hatchet instead of bricks and rocks.

Nation was a vivid part of a thriving "Temperance" movement led by reform-minded Christian women campaigning for a constitutional amendment against alcohol. Eventually, she racked up about 30 arrests in at least three different states.

The block is a straightforward combination of four-patches and plain blocks — but to make the squares line up properly, you need to make a block of a different size, like the one at right. Click on the "Make It!" icon above for a link to instructions for making one.

Steps to Glory

Steps to Glory

Published in 1937, Steps to Glory is credited to Nancy Cabot of the Chicago Tribune.

We've posted a diagram; click on the "Make It!" icon to see it.


Garret Window


Road to California



Attic Window

Garret Window

Garret Window is credited to Nancy Cabot of the Chicago Tribune (1938).

Garret Window looks all but identical to Road to California (Gutcheon, 1973), but Garret Window's layout is simpler. We've posted a diagram.


Road to California

Gutcheon's Road to California shares a layout with Attic Window (Farm Journal, undated).

The layout for both looks like this:

Two other blocks use the same layout. They're Double Hour Glass and Contrary Wife Quilt, and their color placement puts them in a different section of this site. Click here to learn more:

If you're making a Road to California block, though, you might as well just make a Garret Window instead; it's easier.


Attic Window

Attic Window is really the only block of the bunch that's easier to make with this layout: We've posted a diagram.


New Four Patch


World's Fair Block

New Four Patch
World's Fair Block/Buckeye Beauty/Hour Glass/Railroad Crossing/Jacob's Ladder/Going to Chicago/World's Fair/Chicago World's Fair/Statehouse/Railroad/Gay Scrap Quilt/Double Four Patch

Take two four-patches and four half-square triangles, set them in a four-patch arrangement, and you've got the New Four Patch, first published in 1884 by Farm & Fireside magazine. We've used three colors to emphasize the seams. It was originally published as a block of four, like the graphic at lower left.

Use very dark and light colors, and it's a truncated Jacob's Ladder.

World's Fair Block

Quilt blocks named for the World's Fair honored two different World Fairs, both held in Chicago. "World's Fair Block" (left) was named for the 1893 Fair. It's #66 in the Ladies Art Company catalog of 1897. It was presented as is, with dark colors obscuring the inexplicable half-square triangles that make up the one-color squares that alternate with four-patches. Why not just use a square? We've switched the dark and light colors in the whole-quilt mockup.

All the other World's Fair blocks -- those we know of, anyway -- were named for the Fair of 1933.

Spanish Squares

Spanish Squares

Credited to Nancy Cabot of the Chicago Tribune, 1937. It's a thrifter's special, a way to make use of tiny scraps. There are 100 squares to a block, with a dozen of those split into triangles.