<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Nested off-point center square block info
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Economy

 Nested off-point square blocks

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Click on a left-column block to see a whole-quilt mockup.

Scrap (1906)
Scrap
Scrap

From Clara Stone's Practical Needlework (1906). The more different colors and patterns there are in a quilt, the simpler a quilt's pattern has to be to make sense to the eye. Many of the oldest blocks create strong vertical and horizontal patterns that work well when they're made with scraps. The block is identical to 12 Triangles, except that 12 Triangles lacks the off-point square in the center.
Godey's squaresies
Godey's design
Godey's design

The magazine Godey's Lady's Book was the American women's fashion bible for close to a half-century until it died of ossification around1880. Godey's considered quilting (that task of the thrifty wife) beneath the dignity of its well-bred readers, who were presumed to prefer decorative needlework. The block at left is one of the few that the magazine published.
Hour Glass (LAC)
Hour Glass

Economy
Economy

Hour Glass

Hour Glass and Economy are sisters, but not twins.

Hour Glass, the Ladies Art Company block #196 (1897), has a border with end-to-side corners.

End-to-side corners


Economy

Economy Patch

Economy, the LAC's #264 (1897), lacks a border and has diagonal seams running through the corner triangles. The name Economy Patch is from 1935 (Hall).



The King's Crown
The King's Crown
Thrift Block

It's hard not to like The King's Crown, which is a simple pattern ideal for scraps and print fabrics. The block's first publisher, the Kansas City Star (1931), recommended dark, light, and print fabrics, with the print in the four corner squares. It would be very simple to make the opposite squares in two colors, creating a four-patch between the large blocks. Click on the icon to see what we mean.


The name Thrift Block is from designer Nancy Cabot (1937).