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Grid block information

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Click on the block you're interested in to see a whole-quilt mockup.

Ratchet Wheel
Ratchet Wheel

Another block from the Kansas City Star, ca. 1947, Ratchet Wheel is unusual in that every block in the quilt has the full four-sided rectangular frame that is shown in the block at left. Many blocks in a full frame are made to share a side with next-door neighbors. Not this one. Click on the graphic to see a whole-quilt mockup. It's a seven-patch -- that is, drawn up on a 7 x 7 grid.

Pride of Ohio
Pride of Ohio

This block was published in the Kansas City Star in 1939. In a whole quilt, the checkerboard effect disappears, and it looks as if there are two separate blocks set on point. We've shown two- and three-color versions in the whole-quilt mockups. Click on the graphic to see them.

Tangled Garter
Tangled Garter
Garden Maze/The Sun Dial/Tirzah's Treasure

"What on earth can be the significance of a "Tangled Garter?" wrote Ruth Finley in Old Patchwork Quilts (1929). Finley said that the pattern was "exceedingly popular in the early 19th century." Finley was not writing on deadline, so we're assuming did her research. She is the source of the alternate names we've listed above. Of those, she preferred Garden Maze, but we're going to stick with the Ladies Art Company, which published the block first, in 1897, as its #124.

Diamonds in
the Corners
Diamonds in the Corners

This block's story is short: a quilter from Wewoka, Oklahoma, designed and sent it to the Kansas City Star, which published it in 1956.

The Rosebud

The Rosebud

The Star credited this 1942 block to Eunice Turner of Fowler, Kansas. It's drawn up on an 8-square by 8-square grid -- i.e., an 8-patch.


Nauvoo Lattice


Victorian Maze

Nauvoo Lattice

It's a mystery to us how Nancy Cabot came up with the name Nauvoo Lattice for this block, which was published in her Chicago Tribune column in April 1937.

Nauvoo, Illinois is significant to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints, or Mormons. The church's founder, Joseph Smith, and his followers settled there in 1840, but after Smith was killed by a mob in 1844, the church and its members moved on.

In 1937, Mormons began repurchasing the Illinois land on which the Nauvoo Temple once stood. The process began in February, but was reported in a newspaper only in October, months after Cabot's choice of a block name.

Victorian Maze

Another mystery is why Cabot presented a near-identical block in May 1937 and called it Victorian Maze. The blocks are only slightly different.

We've arranged the colors at left to show the differences in seam lines. Both blocks are based on a 12-square by 12-square grid.


Roman Cross







The Casement
Window
Roman Cross

We owe this block to the Ladies Art Company; it's the LAC's #364, and it's based on an 8 x 8 grid. It would be more accurate to call this block a continuous pattern, because any commonsensical quilter would make it in two long rows, one with the cross and a single rectangle and the other as an alternating square and rectangle, thus:

You'd make the gray-colored rows separately from the blue rows and then stitch them all together row by row, with shorter rows for the upper right and lower left corners (or upper left and lower right).

When you see the whole-quilt mockup (click on the green block graphic), you'll see what we're talking about.

The strange feature of this block is the X shape in its center, which could be made of five squares, but isn't. As a result, making it requires Y seams, which seem to terrify some of our fellow quilters. If you would like to make a similar block without Y seams, just make the entire block out of square pieces and don't tell anybody. Your secret is safe with us.


The Casement Window

Evelyn Foland of the Kansas City Star called this Roman Cross look-alike The Casement Window in 1931. The pattern was entirely made of squares (with triangles around the edges). She recommended three colors, with the third a "figured" (print) fabric for the rectangles.

For our money, we'll take this one over Roman Cross. The third color makes the design pop. Click on the graphic at left and you'll see what we mean.

Foland recommended setting the block on point, as it's shown at left. You needn't go to that trouble. You can simply make the quilt using the method we've described for Roman Cross.