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Hen and Chickens
Hen and Chickens

The Ladies Art Company's block #385, Hen and Chickens was published in 1897. Click on the graphic at left to see a whole-quilt mockup.

We'd call Hen and Chickens a bear-paw cloverleaf block or a sailboat sawtooth block*, but since it is both, we've included it in the cross section -- because it's also a cross block.

To see similar blocks, check out these pages:

bear-paw cloverleaf: sailboat sawtooth:

*Note: the terms bear-paw cloverleaf and sailboat sawtooth are used only on this site.

Souvenir of
Friendship

Souvenir of Friendship

Souvenir of Friendship appeared in Clara Stone's booklet Practical Needlework in 1906 as #147. The likelihood is that it got its name from the rectangle that runs across the center, which would have been used for the names of quilters who contributed a block to a quilt destined as a gift

The block is a 5-patch. The seamlines for the dark fabrics are undetectable in our source copy of the booklet, so what you see is our best guess.


Lincoln's Platform
Lincoln's Platform

As a whole quilt, a two-color Lincoln's Platform is simply a Churn Dash in a windowpane setting, laid out on an 8x8 grid. It was published in 1897 in the Ladies Art Company catalog as block #147.

According to Nancy Cabot, who reintroduced the block in a 1934 Chicago Tribune column, Lincoln's Platform was originally pieced in red, white, and blue. Cabot's sources being unnamed, her remark might just as well have been from "the whole cloth," but we've given her the benefit of the doubt in the whole-quilt mockup you'll see when you click on the graphic at left.

Cross in the Square
Cross in the Square
Country Lanes

We're calling this three-color block by its latest name, from a 1976 book called A Gallery of Amish Quilts (Bishop & Safanda). That's because the earlier name is more often used when it is made as a two-color Irish Chain:
Blocks & Bars
Blocks & Bars
Blocks & Bars

From Farm Journal & Farmer's Wife, Silver Anniversary Issue, 1945, according to Jinny Beyer.


Turkey in the Straw

Turkey in the Straw
Mother's Dream/Grandmother's Dream

First published in 1931 as Mother's Dream (Prize Winning Designs), this block is usually known by the more colorful name that the Farm Journal gave it in 1937.

"Turkey in the Straw," a tune dating back to the 1820s, was resurrected in more modern times when Walt Disney used it for Mickey Mouse's debut in the 1928 cartoon "Steamboat Willie." A goat eats the sheet music, and mice play the tune by cranking the goat's tail as if it were a Victrola.


King's Highway
King's Highway

Nancy Page (Florence La Ganke) designed this block for her newspaper column in 1941.

Star & Cross

Star & Cross

This block is from Ruth Finley's 1929 Old Patchwork Quilts. In discussing quilts of the first half of the 19th century, she counts it as one of the "prettiest and most popular" of "many patterns taking their names from Holy Writ [that] were widely employed in making 'every-day' bed-coverings."


Lewis & Clark

Lewis & Clark

This block was #90 in the Clara Stone booklet Needlework: A Practical Guide in 1906. Its many small pieces really come to life only when different colors are used to emphasize the various patterns within the block -- the cross, say, or the area right around the star in its very center (also called Aunt Eliza's Star.) For an example, click on the graphic.