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Colonial Bow Tie


Necktie
Colonial Bow Tie

A basic block like this one has many names and many variations. The one at left, which is drafted on a 6x6 grid, is known as Colonial Bow Tie (1932)—as well as Bow Tie (1970), Necktie Pattern (1935), and The Necktie (1956, Kansas City Star).


Necktie
Peekhole

A similar block with a medium-sized center square block was published as Necktie in the Ladies Art Company catalog of 1928 (#119). It went by Peekhole in a 1931 Woman's World magazine.


True Lover's Knot


Magic Circle

True Lover's Knot

In 1897, the LAC combined four bowtie blocks into a single block for True Lover's Knot (#262), and only broke it apart 31 years later to create Necktie (above).


Magic Circle
Bow Tie in Pink & White/Magical Circle/Necktie/Dumbell Block
[sic]

Magic Circle (the LAC's #384, 1897) amounts to a True Lover's Knot with two of the quarter-blocks turned 180 degrees.

When the Kansas City Star published Magic Circle as Bow Tie in Pink & White in 1956, it pointed out the obvious: That you could use three colors instead of two. At left, however, we show the LAC's two-color version.

The names Dumbell [sic] and Magical Circle are from Nancy Cabot's column in the Chicago Tribune in 1932 and 1933, respectively. Designer Nancy Page came up with the name Necktie (1932).
Four Queens

A whist player named this block, which is credited to Nancy Cabot of the Chicago Tribune (1936). The small triangles, to him, resembled the crowns of 4 queens on a purple and yellow throne.

Whist is a card game, still played in England, that was a precursor to bridge and was popular in the United States in the 19th century.


Wedding Bouquet
Wedding Bouquet

First published in 1943, this block is credited to Nancy Page, whose syndicated quilting column was the source of some 600 blocks and inspired quilters to start a Nancy Page Quilt Club (now defunct).