<%@LANGUAGE="JAVASCRIPT" CODEPAGE="65001"%> Flying Geese block info--3 or fewer geese
FieldGuidetoQuilts.com

Flying Geese—3 or fewer

Email us for permission if you want to use anything on this site.

Copyright © 2017 by


Click on a left-column block to see a whole-quilt mockup.

Road to California
Road to California
Stepping Stones/Kite Tails/Wild Goose Chase/Crossroads

Along with 399 other blocks, Road to California was published in the 1897 Ladies Art Company catalog (#234). Columnist Nancy Page provided 3 other names in 1932 (Stepping Stones) and 1942, and an outfit named Needlecraft Supply, according to Barbara Brackman, came up with the name Crossroads in 1938.

Jacob's Ladder
Jacob's Ladder

The Grandma Dexter variation of Road to California was made from scrap fabrics—not surprising, given it was published during the Great Depression. Why it was named Jacob's Ladder is a mystery. But then, we weren't there to provide an opinion in 1932 (or thereabouts), when it was published.

We didn't find instructions on the web, so we've posted a diagram. Click on the "Make it!" icon above to see it.

Spring Beauty

Spring Beauty

The Kansas City Star's Eveline Foland dreamed up this variation on Toad in a Puddle in 1932. The difference amounts to one additional triangle in each corner.

In the Star's illustration, the area in medium green at left was shown as a print with multiple small dots, much like a pattern on the door of a pie safe. "For those who are not quilters," Foland wrote, "This illustration is adaptable to art metal, for the decoration of boxes and chests and tiles, and for cushion tops."

A similar block called IXL or I Excel, an octagon, was in the Star in 1936. For more information, click here: For Toad in a Puddle, click here:

Wild Goose Chase
Wild Goose Chase
Birds in Flight

This block got its name in 1932's The Patchwork Book, according to Jinny Beyer, whose Quilter's Album also records the name Birds in Flight from American Patchwork Quilts (1973).

The block reflects traditional proportions for flying geese; they're twice as wide as they are tall.

The "Make It!" icon links to instructions for a block of three flying geese that uses paper piecing (a.k.a. foundation piecing). It's a simple way to learn to make flying geese blocks.